CCNA RSE Lab: 5.1.1.6 Configuring Basic Switch Settings

CCNA RSE Lab: 5.1.1.6 Configuring Basic Switch Settings

Topology

Addressing Table

Device Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway
S1 VLAN 99 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1
PC-A NIC 192.168.1.10 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

Objectives
Part 1: Cable the Network and Verify the Default Switch Configuration
Part 2: Configure Basic Network Device Settings

  • Configure basic switch settings.
  • Configure the PC IP address.

Part 3: Verify and Test Network Connectivity

  • Display device configuration.
  • Test end-to-end connectivity with ping.
  • Test remote management capabilities with Telnet.
  • Save the switch running configuration file.

Part 4: Manage the MAC Address Table

  • Record the MAC address of the host.
  • Determine the MAC addresses that the switch has learned.
  • List the show mac address-table command options.
  • Set up a static MAC address.

Background / Scenario
Cisco switches can be configured with a special IP address known as the switch virtual interface (SVI). The SVI, or management address, can be used for remote access to the switch to display or configure settings. If the VLAN 1 SVI is assigned an IP address, by default all ports in VLAN 1 have access to the SVI IP address.

In this lab, you will build a simple topology using Ethernet LAN cabling and access a Cisco switch using the console and remote access methods. You will examine default switch configurations before configuring basic switch settings. These basic switch settings include device name, interface description, local passwords, message of the day (MOTD) banner, IP addressing, and static MAC address.

You will also demonstrate the use of a management IP address for remote switch management. The topology consists of one switch and one host using only Ethernet and console ports.

Note: The switch used is a Cisco Catalyst 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 1 5.0(2) (lanbasek9 image). Other switches and Cisco IOS versions can be used. Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and output produced might vary from what is shown in this lab.

Note: Make sure that the switch has been erased and has no startup configuration. Refer to Appendix A for the procedures to initialize and reload a switch.

Required Resources

  • 1 Switch (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)
  • 1 PC (Windows 7, Vista, or XP with terminal emulation program, such as Tera Term, and Telnet capability)
  • 1 Console cable to configure the Cisco IOS device via the console port
  • 1 Ethernet cable as shown in the topology

Part 1: Cable the Network and Verify the Default Switch Configuration

In Part 1 , you will set up the network topology and verify default switch settings.

Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.
a. Connect the console cable as shown in the topology. Do not connect the PC-A Ethernet cable at this time.

Note: If you are using Netlab, shut down F0/6 on S1 . This has the same effect as not connecting PC-A to S1.

b. Connect to the switch from PC-A using Tera Term or other terminal emulation program.

Why must you use a console connection to initially configure the switch? Why is it not possible to connect to the switch via Telnet or SSH?
No IP addressing parameters are configured yet. A Cisco 2960 switch first placed into service has no networking configured.

Step 2: Verify the default switch configuration.
In this step, you will examine the default switch settings, such as current switch configuration, IOS information, interface properties, VLAN information, and flash memory.

You can access all the switch IOS commands in privileged EXEC mode. Access to privileged EXEC mode should be restricted by password protection to prevent unauthorized use because it provides direct access to global configuration mode and commands used to configure operating parameters. You will set passwords later in this lab.

The privileged EXEC mode command set includes those commands contained in user EXEC mode, as well as the configure command through which access to the remaining command modes is gained. Use the enable command to enter privileged EXEC mode.

a. Assuming the switch had no configuration file stored in nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM), A console connection using Tera Term or other terminal emulation program will place you at the user EXEC mode prompt on the switch with a prompt of Switch>. Use the enable command to enter privileged EXEC mode.

Notice that the prompt changed in the configuration to reflect privileged EXEC mode. Verify that there is a clean default configuration file on the switch by issuing the show running-config privileged EXEC mode command. If a configuration file was previously saved, it must be removed. Depending on the switch model and IOS version, your configuration may look slightly different. However, there should be no configured passwords or IP address. If your switch does not have a default configuration, erase and reload the switch.

Note: Appendix A details the steps to initialize and reload a switch.

b. Examine the current running configuration file.

How many FastEthernet interfaces does a 2960 switch have? ________ 24
How many Gigabit Ethernet interfaces does a 2960 switch have? ________ 2
What is the range of values shown for the vty lines? ________ 0-4 and 5-15 or 0-15

c. Examine the startup configuration file in NVRAM.

Why does this message appear? _________________ No configurations have been saved to NVRAM.

d. Examine the characteristics of the SVI for VLAN 1.
Switch# show interface vlan1

Is there an IP address assigned to VLAN 1? ________ No

What is the MAC address of this SVI? Answers will vary. ____________ 0CD9:96E2:3D40 in this case.

Is this interface up?
Cisco switches have the no shutdown command configured by default on VLAN 1 , but VLAN 1 won’t reach the up/up state until a port is assigned to it and this port is also up. If there is no port in the up state in VLAN 1, then the VLAN 1 interface will be up, line protocol down. By default, all ports are assigned initially to VLAN 1.

e. Examine the IP properties of the SVI VLAN 1.

What output do you see?
Vlan1 is up, line protocol is down
Internet protocol processing disabled

f. Connect an Ethernet cable from PC-A to port 6 on the switch and examine the IP properties of the SVI VLAN 1. Allow time for the switch and PC to negotiate duplex and speed parameters.

Note: If you are using Netlab, enable interface F0/6 on S1.

g. Examine the Cisco IOS version information of the switch.

What is the Cisco IOS version that the switch is running?
Answers may vary. 15.0(2)SE3

What is the system image filename?
Answers may vary. c2960-lanbasek9-mz.150-2.SE3.bin

What is the base MAC address of this switch? Answers will vary.
Answers will vary. 0C:D9:96:E2:3D:00.

h. Examine the default properties of the FastEthernet interface used by PC-A.

Is the interface up or down? _____________________ It should be up unless there is a cabling problem.

What event would make an interface go up? _______________ Connecting a host or other device

What is the MAC address of the interface? ___________________________ 0CD9:96E2:3D06 (Varies)

What is the speed and duplex setting of the interface? ______________________ Full-duplex, 100Mb/s

i. Examine the default VLAN settings of the switch.

What is the default name of VLAN 1? ____________ default

Which ports are in VLAN 1 ?
all ports; F0/1 – F0/24; G0/1, G0/2

Is VLAN 1 active? ____________ Yes

What type of VLAN is the default VLAN? _______________ enet (Ethernet)

j. Examine flash memory.
Issue one of the following commands to examine the contents of the flash directory.

Files have a file extension, such as .bin, at the end of the filename. Directories do not have a file extension.

What is the filename of the Cisco IOS image?
c2960-lanbasek9-mz.150-2.SE.bin (may vary)

Part 2: Configure Basic Network Device Settings

In Part 2, you will configure basic settings for the switch and PC.

Step 1: Configure basic switch settings.

a. Copy the following basic configuration and paste it into S1 while in global configuration mode.

b. Set the SVI IP address of the switch. This allows remote management of the switch.
Before you can manage S1 remotely from PC-A, you must assign the switch an IP address. The default configuration on the switch is to have the management of the switch controlled through VLAN 1. However, a best practice for basic switch configuration is to change the management VLAN to a VLAN other than VLAN 1.

For management purposes, use VLAN 99. The selection of VLAN 99 is arbitrary and in no way implies that you should always use VLAN 99.

First, create the new VLAN 99 on the switch. Then set the IP address of the switch to 192.168.1.2 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 on the internal virtual interface VLAN 99.

Notice that the VLAN 99 interface is in the down state even though you entered the no shutdown command. The interface is currently down because no switch ports are assigned to VLAN 99.

c. Assign all user ports to VLAN 99.

To establish connectivity between the host and the switch, the ports used by the host must be in the same VLAN as the switch. Notice in the above output that the VLAN 1 interface goes down because none of the ports are assigned to VLAN 1. After a few seconds, VLAN 99 comes up because at least one active port (F0/6 with PC-A attached) is now assigned to VLAN 99.

d. Issue the show vlan brief command to verify that all ports are in VLAN 99.

e. Configure the default gateway for S1. If no default gateway is set, the switch cannot be managed from a remote network that is more than one router away. Although this activity does not include an external IP gateway, assume that you will eventually connect the LAN to a router for external access. Assuming that the LAN interface on the router is 192.168.1.1, set the default gateway for the switch.

f. Console port access should also be restricted. The default configuration is to allow all console connections with no password needed. To prevent console messages from interrupting commands, use the logging synchronous option.

g. Configure the virtual terminal (vty) lines for the switch to allow Telnet access. If you do not configure a vty password, you will not be able to Telnet to the switch.

Why is the login command required?
Without the login command, the switch will not prompt for a password.

Step 2: Configure an IP address on PC-A.
Assign the IP address and subnet mask to the PC as shown in the Addressing Table. An abbreviated version of the procedure is described here. A default gateway is not required for this topology; however, you can enter 192.168.1.1 to simulate a router attached to S1 .

  1. Click the Windows Start icon > Control Panel.
  2.  Click View By: and choose Small icons.
  3. Choose Network and Sharing Center > Change adapter settings.
  4. Select Local Area Network Connection, right click and choose Properties.
  5. Choose Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) > Properties.
  6. Click the Use the following IP address radio button and enter the IP address and subnet mask.

Part 3: Verify and Test Network Connectivity

In Part 3, you will verify and document the switch configuration, test end-to-end connectivity between PC-A and S1, and test the switch’s remote management capability.

Step 1: Display the switch configuration.
Use the console connection on PC-A to display and verify the switch configuration. The show run command displays the entire running configuration, one page at a time. Use the spacebar to advance paging.

a. A sample configuration is shown here. The settings you configured are highlighted in yellow. The other configuration settings are IOS defaults.

b. Verify the management VLAN 99 settings.

Step 2: Test end-to-end connectivity with ping.
a. From the command prompt on PC-A, ping the address of PC-A first.

b. From the command prompt on PC-A, ping the SVI management address of S1.

Because PC-A needs to resolve the MAC address of S1 through ARP, the first packet may time out. If ping results continue to be unsuccessful, troubleshoot the basic device configurations. Check both the physical cabling and logical addressing.

Step 3: Test and verify remote management of S1 .
You will now use Telnet to remotely access the switch. In this lab, PC-A and S1 reside side by side. In a production network, the switch could be in a wiring closet on the top floor while your management PC is located on the ground floor. In this step, you will use Telnet to remotely access switch S1 using its SVI management address. Telnet is not a secure protocol; however, you will use it to test remote access. With Telnet, all information, including passwords and commands, are sent across the session in plain text. In subsequent labs, you will use SSH to remotely access network devices.

Instructor Note: Tera Term or other terminal emulation programs with Telnet capability may be used if Telnet from the Windows command prompt is not allowed at your institution.

Note: If you are using Windows 7, the administrator may need to enable the Telnet protocol. To install the Telnet client, open a command window and type pkgmgr /iu:“TelnetClient”. An example is shown below.

a. With the command window still open on PC-A, issue a Telnet command to connect to S1 via the SVI management address. The password is cisco.

b. After entering the password cisco, you will be at the user EXEC mode prompt. Access privileged EXEC mode using the enable command and providing the secret password class.

c. Type exit to end the Telnet session.

Step 4: Save the switch running configuration file.
Save the configuration.

Part 4: Manage the MAC Address Table

In Part 4, you will determine the MAC addresses that the switch has learned, set up a static MAC address on one interface of the switch, and then remove the static MAC address from that interface.

Step 1: Record the MAC address of the host.
Open a command prompt on PC-A and issue the ipconfig /all command to determine and record the Layer 2 (physical) addresses of the NIC. PC-A: 00-50-56-BE-6C-89 (answers will vary)

Step 2: Determine the MAC addresses that the switch has learned.
Display the MAC addresses using the show mac address-table command.

How many dynamic addresses are there? ____________ 1 (can vary)
How many MAC addresses are there in total? ____________ 24 (can vary)
Does the dynamic MAC address match the MAC address of PC-A? ____________ Yes

Step 3: List the show mac address-table options.
a. Display the MAC address table options.

How many options are available for the show mac address-table command? ____________ 12 (can vary)

b. Issue the show mac address-table dynamic command to display only the MAC addresses that were learned dynamically.

How many dynamic addresses are there? ____________ 1 (can vary)
c. View the MAC address entry for PC-A. The MAC address formatting for the command is xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.
S1# show mac address-table address <PC-A MAC here>

Step 4: Set up a static MAC address.
a. Clear the MAC address table.
To remove the existing MAC addresses, use the clear mac address-table dynamic command in privileged EXEC mode.

b. Verify that the MAC address table was cleared.

How many static MAC addresses are there?
at least 20 (other static entries could have been manually created)

Instructor Note: The first 20 static addresses in the MAC address table are built-in.

How many dynamic addresses are there?
0 (may be 1, depending on how quickly addresses are re-acquired by the switch)

c. Examine the MAC table again.
More than likely, an application running on your PC has already sent a frame out the NIC to S1. Look at the MAC address table again in privileged EXEC mode to see if S1 has relearned the MAC address of PC-A.

How many dynamic addresses are there? _________ 1

Why did this change from the last display?
The switch dynamically reacquired the PC MAC address.

If S1 has not yet relearned the MAC address for PC-A, ping the VLAN 99 IP address of the switch from
PC-A, and then repeat the show mac address-table command.

d. Set up a static MAC address.
To specify which ports a host can connect to, one option is to create a static mapping of the host MAC address to a port. Set up a static MAC address on F0/6 using the address that was recorded for PC-A in Part 4, Step 1 . The MAC address 0050.56BE.6C89 is used as an example only. You must use the MAC address of PC-A, which is different than the one given here as an example.

e. Verify the MAC address table entries.

How many total MAC addresses are there? __________ 22 (varies)
How many static addresses are there?

There are 22 static addresses. Total MAC addresses and static addresses should be the same because there are no other devices currently connected to S1 .

f. Remove the static MAC entry. Enter global configuration mode and remove the command by putting a no in front of the command string.

Note: The MAC address 0050.56BE.6C89 is used in the example only. Use the MAC address for PC-A.

g. Verify that the static MAC address has been cleared.

How many total static MAC addresses are there? ____________ 21 (varies)

Reflection
1. Why should you configure the vty password for the switch?
If you do not configure a vty password you will not be able to telnet to the switch.

2. Why change the default VLAN 1 to a different VLAN number?
For improved security.

3. How can you prevent passwords from being sent in plain text?
Issue the service password-encryption command.

4. Why configure a static MAC address on a port interface?
To specify which ports a host can connect to.

a. Console into the switch and enter privileged EXEC mode.

b. Use the show flash command to determine if any VLANs have been created on the switch.

c. If the vlan.dat file was found in flash, then delete this file.

d. You are prompted to verify the filename. If you have entered the name correctly, press Enter; otherwise,
you can change the filename.

e. You are prompted to confirm deletion of this file. Press Enter to confirm.

f. Use the erase startup-config command to erase the startup configuration file from NVRAM. You are prompted to remove the configuration file. Press Enter to confirm.

g. Reload the switch to remove any old configuration information from memory. You will then receive a prompt to confirm reloading of the switch. Press Enter to proceed.

Note: You may receive a prompt to save the running configuration prior to reloading the switch. Respond by typing no and press Enter.

System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: no

h. After the switch reloads, you should see a prompt to enter the initial configuration dialog. Respond by entering no at the prompt and press Enter.

Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: no Switch>

Device Configs
Switch S1

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